Gray Cook’s IFOMPT Keynote Address

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The 2012 International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists Conference was held in Quebec in October 2012. Gray Cook was a keynote speaker. His talk was recorded and provided to us by the Canadian Physical Therapists Association, which you’ll find at physiotherapy.ca. You’ll also find the other session audio files at that link. We thank …

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Self-Limiting Exercise — Naturally Correct Exercise

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Excerpt from the book Movement Click here to download a larger pdf of this self-limiting exercise chart Self-limiting exercises make us think, and even make us feel more connected to exercise and to movement. They demand greater engagement and produce greater physical awareness. Self-limiting exercises do not offer the easy confidence or quick mastery provided …

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Consult Your Doctor Before… Moving?

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The statements can be endless. Consult your doctor before starting exercise…. using this program… participating in activity—and on, and on, and on. That suggestion is actually made to protect your health, not to refine or individualize your personal approach to exercise activity and athletic endeavors. Many in the general public assume they may receive some …

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Please Don’t Buy My Book

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Please don’t buy my book, Movement… If— If— you need a self-help book you need lots of colorful anatomical drawings to hold your attention you believe that knowledge of anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics will completely prepare you to manage movement dysfunction you are looking for prepackaged exercise and rehabilitation programming you want a quick, short …

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The Great Equalizers

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In the book Movement, my co-authors and I discuss self-limiting exercises, including a chart accompanied with a list and more in-depth explanations of the concept. We discuss the notion in the context of exercises that naturally impose simultaneous yet paradoxical physical demands like strength and balance, or power and control, performance outcomes. Simply stated, these …

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The Weakest Link

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“Why can’t I just have a well-designed program filled with a lot of the corrective exercises done as part of the warm-up, covering all the bases instead of screening and worrying about the weakest link?” I recently responded to this question in an interview with Anthony Renna on Strength Coach Podcast and expanded on the …

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Chapter 3 for iPhone & iPad

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In Chapter 3, you’ll gain an appreciation of the natural laws of basic movement before specific, with an overview of how to use screening, testing and assessment to classify movement proficiency or deficiency. You’ll also get a summary of the differences between the two systems, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Selective Functional Movement …

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Chapter 2 for iPhone & iPad

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The next 16 pages expand on the differences between authentic movement and scientific anatomical function. The functional systems of muscles, joints and ligaments are covered, as are the fascial matrix, breathing and the neuromuscular network. Understanding movement deficiency and dysfunction and how these develop will illuminate your work, and clarify your explanations to your athletes, …

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Table of Contents and Index

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You might also want to use this Index pdf file to help in your book-buying decision. Contents Foreword 11 Preface 13 1 INTRODUCTION TO SCREENING AND ASSESSMENT The Practice of Movement Screening and Assessment 17 | Body Parts Versus Movement Patterns 18 | The Movement Versus Motion Paradox 19 | Movement is Our Business 21 …

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Chapters

Chapter One: Introduction to Screening and Assessment

This introductory chapter builds the foundation you’ll need to fully understand the purpose of screening movement. You’ll learn the concept of movement patterns and how to recognize these patterns in action, as well as the history and primary goals of movement screening. In the video above— In this 24-minute clip, Gray discusses the purpose of …

Chapter Two: Anatomical Science versus Functional Science

The next 16 pages expand on the differences between authentic movement and scientific anatomical function. The functional systems of muscles, joints and ligaments are covered, as are the fascial matrix, breathing and the neuromuscular network. Understanding movement deficiency and dysfunction and how these develop will illuminate your work, and clarify your explanations to your athletes, …

Chapter Three: Understanding Movement

In Chapter 3, you’ll gain an appreciation of the natural laws of basic movement before specific, with an overview of how to use screening, testing and assessment to classify movement proficiency or deficiency. You’ll also get a summary of the differences between the two systems, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Selective Functional Movement …

Chapter Four: Movement Screening

Where in your intake process should you screen? Can you screen an injured client or athlete? This section will help you place movement screening in your existing business model, or it will show you where your program structure might be improved. In this article, The Weakest Link, Gray expands on the idea of screening vs …

Chapter Five: Functional Movement Systems and Movement Patterns

This summary explains the differences between the two systems, the FMS for fitness professionals and strength coaches, and the SFMA for medical professionals. You’ll get a brief look at the systems, and finish with an appreciation of primitive and higher-level movement patterns. This article, FMS vs SFMA, provides an overview of the two systems. Be …

Chapter Six: Functional Movement Screen Descriptions

The chapter used to cover the FMS will teach you the seven basic screens in detail, including where to stand, what to watch for during the movements and how to plan your modifications. You’ll get a description of each screen, the purpose of each, tips for testing, implications and photographs showing how to score each …

Chapter Seven: SFMA Introduction and Top-Tier Tests

The top-tier assessments of the SFMA are covered in these 26 pages, which contain a discussion of the overlying considerations of functional versus dysfunctional and painful versus non-painful, the overriding criteria of the SFMA system. The seven elements of the top-tier will direct you to the breakout tests found in Chapter 8. Audio commentary:Gray talks …

Chapter Eight: SFMA Assessment Breakout Descriptions and Flowcharts

Taking 58 pages and 66 photographs to cover the SFMA breakouts will serve to remind medical professionals of the individual assessments, and at the same time make fitness trainers and strength coaches aware of the tests used by professionals to whom they refer clients and athletes. The rationale for each of the breakout regions will …

Chapter Nine: Analyzing the Movements in Screens and Assessments

Chapter 9 teaches how to analyze the various test results. Using the tests of the Functional Movement Screen as the base, you’ll learn what mistakes most beginners make in screening, how to distinguish between stability and mobility problems and how to determine asymmetries. Here you’ll get your first introduction to reverse patterning (RP) and reactive …

Chapter 10: Understanding Corrective Strategies

This begins the wrap-up: What do you do with the resulting screen and assessment information? The 20 pages of Chapter 10 comprise the performance pyramid and how to use it to form your corrective strategies. Understanding the differences between correct and corrective exercises, between challenging versus difficult, and having a selection of self-limiting exercises in …

Chapter 11: Developing Corrective Strategies

Now that you’ve discovered dysfunctional patterns in your clients, athletes and patients, the next section will guide you in the corrective decisions that make up the three primary categories of mobility, stability and movement pattern retraining. You’ll get comparisons of conditioning and corrective exercise, movement prep and movement correction, skill training and corrective prioritization, and …

Chapter 12: Building the Corrective Framework

This chapter provides a checklist for your corrective decisions: pain, purpose, posture, position, pattern and plan. Even though every person’s movement is unique, without this framework, your corrective path will not be as clear as it could be. You’ll also become familiar with the basic structure involving special considerations and populations that may make up …

Chapter 13: Movement Pattern Corrections

Chapter 13 builds on your knowledge of basic mobility and stability corrections and movement pattern retraining. Using passive, active and assistive techniques, you’ll be able to help your clients, athletes and patients recover lost mobility. Understanding stability and motor control, transitional postures and using facilitation techniques such as reactive neuromuscular training will give you the …

Chapter 14: Advanced Corrective Strategies

Finally, in the 24 pages of Chapter 14, you’ll learn how to make corrective exercise an experience. This is how corrective exercise actually works in the human body, and the thorough discussion found in this chapter will teach you how to create this for your clientele. Using PNF, RNT, reverse patterning, conscious loading, resisted and …

Chapter 15: In Conclusion

This wrap-up section pulls the material together for one last review of where the industry is now, and where it’s heading. When you finish this section, you’ll have a complete understanding of the 10 principles of the Functional Movement System. These principles will guide you in learning and training authentic movement. In this clip from …

Chapter 2 for iPhone & iPad

The next 16 pages expand on the differences between authentic movement and scientific anatomical function. The functional systems of muscles, joints and ligaments are covered, as are the fascial matrix, breathing and the neuromuscular network. Understanding movement deficiency and dysfunction and how these develop will illuminate your work, and clarify your explanations to your athletes, …

Chapter 3 for iPhone & iPad

In Chapter 3, you’ll gain an appreciation of the natural laws of basic movement before specific, with an overview of how to use screening, testing and assessment to classify movement proficiency or deficiency. You’ll also get a summary of the differences between the two systems, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Selective Functional Movement …